Month: July 2018

$30m for early education

There will be $30million in National Partnership funding for NSW early education over the next two years.
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Education Minister Adrian Piccoli announced a number of measures including:

— fee relief for the most disadvantaged families, so their children can access preschool at no charge for up to two years;

— infrastructure support program for modification of buildings;

— a trial of cluster management arrangements aimed at helping smaller services;

— targeted workforce development including scholarships for educators to upgrade their qualifications;

— introduction of a transition-to-school statement; and

— support for services to move to a 15 hour a week delivery format.

‘‘The State’s preschools are doing a great job in nurturing our young children and providing them with the best-quality early learning and care,” Mr Piccoli said.

‘‘These measures will make a difference.’’

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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$30m for early education

There will be $30million in National Partnership funding for NSW early education over the next two years.
Nanjing Night Net

Education Minister Adrian Piccoli announced a number of measures including:

— fee relief for the most disadvantaged families, so their children can access preschool at no charge for up to two years;

— infrastructure support program for modification of buildings;

— a trial of cluster management arrangements aimed at helping smaller services;

— targeted workforce development including scholarships for educators to upgrade their qualifications;

— introduction of a transition-to-school statement; and

— support for services to move to a 15 hour a week delivery format.

‘‘The State’s preschools are doing a great job in nurturing our young children and providing them with the best-quality early learning and care,” Mr Piccoli said.

‘‘These measures will make a difference.’’

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Read more

$30m for early education

There will be $30million in National Partnership funding for NSW early education over the next two years.
Nanjing Night Net

Education Minister Adrian Piccoli announced a number of measures including:

— fee relief for the most disadvantaged families, so their children can access preschool at no charge for up to two years;

— infrastructure support program for modification of buildings;

— a trial of cluster management arrangements aimed at helping smaller services;

— targeted workforce development including scholarships for educators to upgrade their qualifications;

— introduction of a transition-to-school statement; and

— support for services to move to a 15 hour a week delivery format.

‘‘The State’s preschools are doing a great job in nurturing our young children and providing them with the best-quality early learning and care,” Mr Piccoli said.

‘‘These measures will make a difference.’’

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Read more

$30m for early education

There will be $30million in National Partnership funding for NSW early education over the next two years.
Nanjing Night Net

Education Minister Adrian Piccoli announced a number of measures including:

— fee relief for the most disadvantaged families, so their children can access preschool at no charge for up to two years;

— infrastructure support program for modification of buildings;

— a trial of cluster management arrangements aimed at helping smaller services;

— targeted workforce development including scholarships for educators to upgrade their qualifications;

— introduction of a transition-to-school statement; and

— support for services to move to a 15 hour a week delivery format.

‘‘The State’s preschools are doing a great job in nurturing our young children and providing them with the best-quality early learning and care,” Mr Piccoli said.

‘‘These measures will make a difference.’’

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Golfers wind up

A strong easterly wind sweeping across the Roxby Downs Golf Club on Saturday did not dampen the spirit of enthusiastic golfers who played their hearts out for the annual Greyhound sponsored event.
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Each team of four players made their rounds in the hot and windy condition much to the delight of the few spectators.

A total of 16 teams participated in the fund raising event.

All the money raised will go towards Canteen, an organisation which looks after the welfare of kids with cancer.

Making their mark as the overall winner was the team comprised of Phil Moon, Dougal Mcleod, Noel Riley and Adam Mckee racking up 54.875 points.

Also competing well in the second place with 56 points were Robert Paxton, Mark Dillon, John Lachmund and Neil Taylor.

In third position were Robin Passmore, Tony Holbrook, Tony Forest and Harry Noll who scored 56 points.

Glen Mungur, Andy Highet, Freedy and Tim Czydel scored 57.25 points to take fourth place.

Coming fifth with 58.375 points were David Pattenden, Tony Bow, Don Casseyley and Barry Dadleh.

For the mixed team, Ruth Dyker, Raymond Hook, Lance Selleck and Grace Selleck won with 62.375 points.

Also impressing with the ladies taking the number one spot were Ann Shields, Linda Evans, Jane Jones and Andrea Freeth who scored 60.75 points.

Another round of competition expected to draw a large crowd will be held this week.

ALL IN: The champion ladies team of Jane Jones, Andrea Freeth, Ann Shields and Linda Evans.

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No Blues

THE Northern District Cricket Association’s A grade competition will be one team short during the 2012/13 season following Murrabit’s decision to go into recess.
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The club has spent the past few weeks trying to increase its playing numbers, but decided last week that it could not field a side this season.

“We had minimal interest (in attracting numbers),” club president, Brent McKnight said.

During the past few seasons the Blues have relied on a group of people they could rely upon when numbers were short.

However injuries, players moving out of the district and a lack of numbers led to the decision.

“A number of people have left Murrabit and Benjeroop, which is very difficult,” McKnight said.

The club considered moving its home matches to Kerang to attract players, but was ultimately ruled out as a last resort.

“We do not expect the clubs to bend over backwards for us,” McKnight said.

“If we had seen a growth in the number of juniors then we would have put up the numbers and struggled throughout, but unfortunately this was not the case.”

The club is hoping the next generation of players will come from the children aged between five and eight years living in the district.

“Maybe in five to six years they will be interested in cricket, and then we may be able to start a junior side,” McKnight said.

The decision leaves Barham Koondrook, Cohuna United, Leitchville/Gunbower, Nondies and Wandella competing in this year’s A grade competition.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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Roxby swimmers to take on the state

Expect more gold from Roxby Downs swimmers when they take on the best from across the state in the annual swimming carnival on November 24.
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Swimming coach Phillipa Weltaner said this year’s participants would rise to another level following the success of last year’s swimmers.

A total of 150 swimmers will battle in the pool and hopes are high that Roxby Downs will be showcasing some of its new talents who are being eyed as gold prospects.

Weltaner said the swimmers have six weeks to work on their general fitness with officials keeping an open door policy for those who wish to be registered.

She said as of last week only 15 swimmers had registered themselves, all of whom had a trial run on the pool on Saturday under the close eyes of the coaches.

“I think we have enough time to keep up with our fitness and strength and we should be ready come November 24,” said Weltaner.

It looks promising to retain their title for this year’s meet are three times gold medallist winner Julia Weltnar and the upcoming Mathew Lowe who showed power and skills while being tested on the pool last week.

Weltaner called on swimmers to remain focus on the task ahead and be punctual on training.

“I believe the swimmers are more confident now for all age groups and we should be doing okay,” she said.

LOOKING FOR GOLD: Looking for gold at the upcoming swimming carnival are Dewald, Werner and Emil.

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Cricket season to start

THE Northern District Cricket Association season will begin its 2012/13 season on Saturday with a series of Twenty-20 matches in the A grade.
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All of the T20 matches will be played at Cohuna’s recreation reserve.

The first round of matches will begin at 12.30pm, with Wandella up against Cohuna United on oval number one and Nondies playing Leitchville Gunbower on oval number two.

Round two starts at 3.30pm, with Nondies hosting Cohuna United and Barham Koondrook playing Wandella on the first oval.

Bowling will be the key and there could be a few surprise results.

Both B grade and the under 17s will resume with their normal formats.

In B grade Kerang FT host Cohuna United, Wakool is at home to Nondies, Mincha host Wandella, Footballers have the local derby against Leitchville Gunbower and Barham Koondrook play Pyramid Hill at Koondrook.

B grade will be using white four-piece Senator cricket balls this season.

Some teams are struggling for numbers which is often the case at this time of year.

Wakool should again be a strong team. Wandella, Leitchville Gunbower and Barham Koondrook are other teams who may be hard to beat early in the season.

This season B grade has a general bye on Cod Opening and Australia Day, and this will be welcomed by some battled hardened players.

The under 17s will play two day games. These now finish at 11.15am after starting at the normal time of 8.45am. They will be using red four-piece Senator balls.

Cohuna United hosts Pyramid Hill, Leitchville Black play Leitchville Red in Leitchville, Nondies are at home against Wandella and Barham Koondrook has the bye.

The under 14s start on October 20 with a seven team competition.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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Teachers blitz airwaves against $1.7b education cuts

A campaign against cuts to public education has been launched by the NSW Teachers Federation.
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A $1.7billion decrease were announced by the NSW government and the Federation fears it will damage the education of students in schools and at TAFE colleges.

Teachers Federation Acting President Gary Zadkovich said the government had broken their promise.

‘‘When the government announced its changed education policies they promised not to cut education funding — they lied,’’ he said.

‘‘In September 2012, they cut education funding by $1.7billion, the biggest cut to education in the history of NSW.

‘‘By cutting over 1800 education staff and the programs they run, schools and colleges will be forced to do more with less.

‘‘The advertising blitz is part of the ongoing campaign to stop this happening by forcing the government to reverse the cuts.’’

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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Thumbs down to Carbon Farming Initiative

WHEATBELTfarmers are not confident of extracting great benefit from the Carbon FarmingInitiative (CFI).
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This was theundertone from one of the Wheatbelt NRM’s Carbon Roadshow held in Hyden onSeptember 26.

The WheatbeltNRM also hosted the Carbon Roadshow in Merredin, Bencubbin and Dalwallinu.

While growerssaid it was the first time they had the opportunity to hear unbiasedinformation, many felt there was limited incentive in becoming involved in aCFI.

Keynote speaker,Australian Farm Institute executive director Mick Keogh, said the AustralianCarbon Policy had established a new currency and a new market, which farmershad the choice of becoming involved in.

He saidbasically farmers could earn Australian Carbon Credit Units (ACCUs) through theCFI which they could then sell on the market.

While there weresome opportunities to earn a return from selling their ACCUs, Mr Keogh saidthere were also a number of constraints which would impact the uptake of CFIsby the individual farmer.

He said with theexpertise and detail required to be involved in a CFI, the likely development inthe carbon policy was to come from the large carbon companies decreasing theiremissions.

“For theindividual farmer it could chew up more administration costs than it would beworth,” Mr Keogh said.

“Plus themarketing in the short-term is a very big constraint.

“I think scaleis going to be important.

“If a farmer has500 credits they wanted to sell, it would be like spare change on the floor toa large carbon company who would need five million credits.”

The price ofcarbon a tonne also needed to be considered, according to Mr Keogh.

Initially theFederal Government has set a fixed price on carbon at $23 a tonne, increasingby five per cent a year until 2015, after which the price will become marketbased and fluctuate accordingly.

But knowing whatthe price would do after 2015 was hard to determine.

He said as of2015, the Federal Government would be also limiting the number of AustralianCarbon Credit Units (ACCUs) made available, therefore adding pressure on themarket and presumably pushing the price of carbon up.

But Mr Keoghsaid it wasn’t that simple.

“The FederalGovernment intends to link the Australian market to the European market, whichwill change the stakes again,” he said.

“It will meanthe price of carbon will be dictated by the international market and given thesituation in Europe there is a still a lot of uncertainty.

“Since 2008 theprice has steadily decreased and is now sitting at around eight Euros a tonne($A10-$A11/t).

“Carbon behaveslike any other commodity which growers need to understand before entering intoany carbon farming project.”

Mr Keogh alsosaid it was important to consider the added sovereign risk occurring in thecarbon market.

“This is amarket created entirely by government and subject to rule changes as thegovernment sees fit or as governments change,” he said.

Under the CFI MrKeogh said there were two ways farmers could earn credits, either throughsequestration (removing carbon from the atmosphere) or mitigation (reducingcarbon going into the atmosphere).

He said in bothsystems growers wouldn’t get credits for doing something they were alreadydoing.

In regards to asequestration system, permanence was also a key requirement.

“Sequestrationprojects have to be maintained for 100 years,” he said.

“And theyrequire a caveat on the title to maintain that project.

“Should theproject be discontinued the farmer would then have an obligation to repay allthe credits earned over the life of the project.”

The costs andlegal implications involved in establishing either a sequestration project or amitigation project were also an issue, according to Mr Keogh.

He cited anexample of a single species tree project on 100 hectares (50ha sown per year),which would end up costing about $15,000 just to establish.

“Then you haveto consider the yearly costs, plus the cost of an audit every third year whichwould be about $3000,” he said.

Living Farm research manager Dr Andew Wherrett, Wheatbelt NRM project manager for sustainable agriculture Georgie Troup and Australian Farm Institute executive director Mick Keogh at the Carbon Roadshow in Hyden.

Holt Rock farmer Sarah Mudge.

Hyden farmers John Cashmore and Colin Nicholl.

Hyden farmer Paul Green.

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